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SLIDE OF THE WEEK

Honeymoon in a bar

This slide is marked "first dance." I have no idea who this just-married couple is, but I do know that the bar has a mesmerizing interior. Knotty pine paneling, cozy brick fireplace, a dead deer head and double spot lit sailfish, which by the way, is protected by a rope trimmed barrier. That’s a good thing because stuffed sailfish damage very easily.

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SLIDE OF THE WEEK

Southern California Family Portrait

Last week I had a pop-culture experience of the highest order. I was headed south on the 405 just past Long beach on my way to a Southern Californialand book signing at Book Soup at South Coast Plaza. It was rush hour and traffic was stop-and-go, of course. Then suddenly my spirit was soaring in a way that it never had before. I spotted the Oscar Meyer Weenie Mobile a few cars in front of me. Soon we were side-by-side and stayed that way a few miles. Getting stuck in traffic with the Oscar Meyer Weenie Mobile is WONDERFUL!!

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SLIDE OF THE WEEK

Texas State Fair

This week’s slide, TEXAS STATE FAIR, 1954, DALLAS TEXAS was inspired by my trip here today to do a slide show for the Dallas Video Festival. I never confuse slides with video but I guess they do -oh well. Anyway what a whirl wind day it’s been. From the time that I stepped off the plane into the blast furnace-like heat and humidity it’s been an action packed day of sightseeing, sweating, delicious Tex-Mex food and two (I splurged) margaritas.

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SLIDE OF THE WEEK

Hot Dog Show

In my hometown of Ontario, five years ago when I was running around out there looking for images to include in my first book, Cruising the Pomona Valley 1930 thru 1970, I ran across this amazing slide. I got it from the owner of the Hot Dog Show, Norma Jones. I wonder if she ever noticed that those red and white striped curtains look more like a rather large person squatting -therefore making those hot dogs with angel wings and halos very unappetizing.

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SLIDE OF THE WEEK

Watching home movies

When I was growing up in the 60s and 70s it seemed like every family took home movies. My family did - with a super 8 movie camera. I loved the sound of the film turning inside of it. For a couple of years, around the time I was about nine or ten, my parents used it occasionally, until they cast it aside and lost interest in it. Ten or so years ago after not seeing my family’s home movies since I was a kid I had them transferred to video. Ever so eager to see them again, I was more than disappointed to discover that out of an hour and a half of film I was hardly in them at all. Oh well.

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