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BROADWAY AND 7TH – DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES – 1947

Downtown Los Angeles

The busiest intersection in town is bustling with activity. An electric streamliner street car heads north on Broadway. A banner blows in the morning breeze. Broadway is one of the few streets in Los Angeles that actually looks like a traditional big American city.

Lined with more department stores, specialty shops, eating places and movie palaces than anywhere else in Southern California, for many years Broadway was the retail and entertainment backbone of Los Angeles. For more than fifty years, beginning just after the turn of the century, Broadway, between 4th and 9th streets was a destination location for the masses who came from the suburbs, primarily by streetcar, to shop, go to the movies, and eat.

On the left side of the street is Bullock’s department store, Le Roy’s Jewelry, Kress Five & Dime, the Los Angeles Theater and Swelldom, which sold women’s fashions. On the right, Clifton’s Brookdale Cafeteria, Harris & Frank, and Bond, both men’s and women’s clothing stores, and The Palace Theater. The KRKD radio tower on the Arcade Building broadcasted from 1932 to 1961.

During the 50s, Broadway’s demographic began to change and become what it is today – a hustling-bustling multi-cultural market place and largest concentration of historic movie palaces in the world. The last streetcar ran in downtown Los Angeles in 1963.

GOD BLESS AMERICANA AND BROADWAYANA!